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Snapshots

  1. Ash Trees

    Snapshot Title: Ash Trees
    Taken by: Matthew Opdyke

    Image: Wingfield Pines: Wetland Sapling Survey
    Image Owner: Matthew Opdyke



    Description:

    Are those the leaves of a green ash or white ash? The leaves of the two species are so similar it's sometimes difficult to tell them apart. What they do have in common are stems that are opposite each...



  2. American Elm

    Snapshot Title: American Elm
    Taken by: Matthew Opdyke

    Image: Wingfield Pines: Wetland Sapling Survey
    Image Owner: Matthew Opdyke



    Description:

    American elm (Ulmus americana) accounts for on average, 20% of all saplings at Wingfield Pines. This sapling is easy to identify by its doubly-toothed leaves that feel like sandpaper. Although these s...



  3. Boxelder

    Snapshot Title: Boxelder
    Taken by: Matthew Opdyke

    Image: Wingfield Pines: Wetland Sapling Survey
    Image Owner: Matthew Opdyke



    Description:

    Boxelder (Acer negundo) was once the most abundant sapling at Wingfield Pines, accounting for 35% of all woody plants in 2010. By 2016, nearly half of all boxelders died; and were replaced by American...



  4. American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis)

    Snapshot Title: American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis)
    Taken by: Matthew Opdyke

    Image: Wingfield Pines: Wetland Sapling Survey
    Image Owner: Matthew Opdyke



    Description:

    It is difficult to see the leaves in this snapshot but if you zoom into the trunk of the center tree you may find that it looks "sickly." The peeling bark, with white patches is an identification sign...