1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar


One Dollar Bill (Front), 8.6 Gigapixel Macro Photograph by Gene Cooper

Want to add this gigapan to your favorites? Log In or Sign Up now.

Log In now to add this Gigapan to a group gallery.

About This Gigapan

Toggle
Taken by
Gene Cooper Gene Cooper
Explore score
11
Size
8.59 Gigapixels
Views
5934
Date added
Aug 26, 2009
Date taken
Aug 25, 2009
Categories
 
Galleries
Competitions
Tags
Description

This photograph was constructed from 1,800 individual photographs using a new prototype macro photography robotic system. The technology combines focus stacking, stitching, and a robotic photo rig to create each gigapixel macro photograph. We look forward to developing collaborations and partnerships that will help us put the technology into the hands of the public and welcome your suggestions, comments, and feedback. Learn more about the technology at www.gigamacro.com Will open in a new tab or window/
Here is some more information about the US One Dollar Bill...

The basic face and back designs of all denominations of United States paper currency, except the backs of the $1 and $2 denominations in general circulation today, were adopted in 1928.

The front of the bills feature portraits of famous, deceased American statesmen: George Washington on the $1, Thomas Jefferson on the $2, Abraham Lincoln on the $5, Alexander Hamilton on the $10, Andrew Jackson on the $20, Ulysses Grant on the $50, and Benjamin Franklin on the $100. Notes of higher denominations, while no longer produced featured William McKinley on the $500, Grover Cleveland on the $1000, James Madison on the $5000, and Salmon Chase on the $10,000.

Faceplate Numbers and Letters are the small numbers and letters that can be found in the lower right and upper left corners of a bill. In the left corner is the Note Position Number. This consists of the Note Position Letter and a quadrant number. The combination indicates the position of the note on the plate from which it was printed. In the lower right corner, the Note Position Letter is followed by the Plate Serial Number. This identifies the plate from which the note was printed. The Plate Serial Number for the reverse (back) side of the note is in the lower-right corner, just inside the ornamental border on the reverse of the bill.

Bills that bear a small "FW" in the lower right corner on the face of the note (to the left of the note position letter) indicate that the bill was printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas.

Here are a few interesting facts about the one dollar bill...

The first $1 notes (called United States Notes or "Legal Tenders") were issued by the Federal Government in 1862 and featured a portrait of Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase (1861-1864).
The first use George Washington's portrait on $1 notes was on Series 1869 United States Notes.
The inclusion of "In God We Trust" on all currency was required by law in 1955. The national motto first appeared on paper money in 1957 on $1 Silver Certificates, and on all Federal Reserve Notes beginning with Series 1963.
The first $1 Federal Reserve Notes were issued in 1963. The design, featuring George Washington on the face and the Great Seal on the back, has not changed.
Of all the notes printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, $1 notes make up about 45% of currency production.
The life span of a $1 Federal Reserve Note is 21 months. (Other denominations have different life spans.

Information provided courtesy of the US Bureau of Engraving and Printing
www.bep.treas.gov Will open in a new tab or window/
We welcome your comments and hope you enjoy exploring the image!

Gene Cooper
Four Chambers Studio
www.fourchambers.org Will open in a new tab or window/
www.gigamacro.com Will open in a new tab or window/
gene@fourchambers.org Will open in a new tab or window


Gigapan Comments (0)

Toggle Minimize gigapan_comment
The GigaPan EPIC Series, Purchase an GigaPan EPIC model and receive GigaPan Stitch complimentary

Where in the World is this GigaPan?

Toggle
Sorry, this gigapan has no location information.

Member Log In