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StarPano by C L

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About This Gigapan

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Taken by
C L C L
Explore score
96
Size
0.09 Gigapixels
Views
1582
Date added
Oct 14, 2010
Date taken
Oct 14, 2010
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Description

Yosemite National Park, Sept., Leica DLux4, 30 sec exposures. Really exciting to see red shift and blue shift from the stars! Not so big. A quality panorama of a starfield would be hard, wouldn't it? Unless using multiple cameras.


Gigapan Comments (6)

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  1. Patrick Salsbury

    Patrick Salsbury (December 10, 2010, 03:00PM )

    This is a really cool shot! It's inspired me to start thinking about hooking my GigaPan up to my telescope tracking mount and try some astrophotos with it. Very nice work! I'll try to post some more thoughts in a bit, but wanted to post some props right away! :-)

  2. Nathan Wong

    Nathan Wong (October 16, 2010, 10:30AM )

    One of the reasons why people made such a big deal about the Nikon D700 was because the image is really clean with high ISO's up to 6400. After that it gets a little iffy, but I have taken pictures up to 25,000. I didn't do any post processing other than to crop the picture to see the close-ups of the stars.

  3. C L

    C L (October 16, 2010, 05:19AM )

    I see what you mean. Your photos demonstrate it well, and as you say the 4 second exposure seems like a good starting point. All the noise from a high ISO really bothers me, though you don't have much showing up in your shots. Did you do any post processing? I was able to reduce the noise in the images I took, but lost a lot of the stars and color in the process so tried to split the difference. I live near a lot of light so I won't be able to get a clear night sky again anytime in the foreseeable future, unfortunately. Thanks for your input.

  4. Nathan Wong

    Nathan Wong (October 15, 2010, 02:49PM )

    I know exactly how you felt with the excitement of actually taking pictures of stars. I was pretty excited when I was doing just that with my Nikon D700. I made a bunch of tests and posted them on Flickr if you'd like to look at them. It appears that 4 seconds is about where you want to be to get stars without getting star trails. Of course the higher your ISO the more stars you'll capture. I got pictures of the milky way at the Grand Canyon using ISO 1600 and 3200. I wanted to do a Gigapan of the sky, but decided against it since it was too windy. It wasn't until later that I tried making a HDR that I shot about a minute apart that I realized the stars moved too much. Here are the pictures that will probably help you a little. I basically tested to see what shutter speed I could use so the stars didn't streak: 85mm lens f/2.8 10 seconds www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615119233 Will open in
a new tab or window/ www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615939704 Will open in
a new tab or window/ 85mm f/2.8 8 seconds www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615938122 Will open in
a new tab or window/ www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615939600 Will open in
a new tab or window/ 85mm f/2.8 4 seconds www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615936942 Will open in
a new tab or window/ www.flickr.com/photos/59419492@N00 /3615119313 Will open in
a new tab or window/

  5. C L

    C L (October 15, 2010, 11:33AM )

    I had the streaks on each frame, as i had suspected i would, but was trying to split the difference between getting a full field of stars and some expected streaking. Like I said i was really excited about getting the red shift (light waves compressing towards us across the universe) and blue shift (light receding). When i checked the back of the camera and saw all those red and blue dots, as well as the milky way, that was just great. if I try it again, I might consider 4 cameras, each facing a different direction, and a 15 second exposure. Lots of movement going on, earth, stars, light bending and scattering through the atmosphere. It would be a real challenge to get a clean 360 starfield gigapan, especially with low noise.

  6. Nathan Wong

    Nathan Wong (October 15, 2010, 11:23AM )

    The problem with doing a picture of a star field, especially at 30 seconds a frame is that the Earth moves and the stars aren't stationary. So if you stitch them all the frames together you get a picture that looks like you left your camera shutter open for a few minutes, meaning you get star "streaks."

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